News

OpenScope – first shared observatory for neuroscience

Our project was selected for the 2019 call of the OpenScop at the Allen Institute for Brain Science, Seattle, USA. Together with Lucy Palmer (University of Melbourne), Richard Naud (University of Ottawa), Daniel Millman and Saskia de Vries (Allen Institute at the Allen Institute for Brain Science), and the OpenScope team we study how the brain encodes visual information.

The OpenScope is the first shared observatory for neuroscience that allows to researchers outside the Allen Institute access to a standardized, high-throughput experimental platform, the Allen Brain Observatory. For more information about the OpenScope program, please refer to the full press release of the Allen Institute for Brain Science and Einstein Center for Neurosciences Berlin.

Here you can watch the talk “OpenScope: a community-driven brain observatory” at the 2019 Allen Showcase Symposium hosted by the Allen Institute for Brain Science.

Allen Showcase Symposium 2017, Allen Institute for Brain Science

Here you can watch my lightning talk “Single synaptic inputs drive spiking in PV neurons in vivo” at the Allen Showcase Symposium 2017 hosted by the Allen Institute for Brain Science.

Allen Showcase Symposium 2016, Allen Institute for Brain Science

Here you can watch my talk “Principles underlying sensory map topography in primary visual cortex” at the Allen Showcase Symposium 2016 hosted by the Allen Institute for Brain Science.

Allen Institute for Brain Science Next Generation Leaders 2016

Here you can read about the 2016 announcement of the newest cohort of the Next Generation Leaders at the Allen Institute for Brain Science: Allen Institute for Brain Science Announces 2016 Next Generation Leaders; which was also covered by the Bernstein Network Computational Neuroscience: Jens Kremkow and Richard Naud are Next Generation Leaders 2016 at Allen Institute for Brain Science

Kremkow et al. 2016 Nature 

Here you can watch a video about our findings: SUNY Optometry scientists discover a surprising central role of darks in brain visual maps

Kremkow et al. 2014 PNAS

In the study “Kremkow et al. Neuronal nonlinearity explains greater visual spatial resolution for darks than lights. PNAS 2014″ we demonstrate fundamental differences in the way lights and darks are processed in the visual system and we show that these differences can explain a phenomenon first described by Galileo almost 400 years ago that was still puzzling astronomers today. This article received worldwide press coverage from more than 30 news outlets, including: Scientific American National GeographicSPIEGEL ONLINETIME MagazineEl MundoLe Scienze. For a full list of mentions please refer to the Altmetric site of the article. Here you can watch a video about the findings: Mystery Behind Galileo’s Visual Illusion Discovered

Kremkow et al. 2010b Journal of Neuroscience

The study “Kremkow et al. Gating of Signal Propagation in Spiking Neural Networks by Balanced and Correlated Excitation and Inhibition. Journal of Neuroscience 2010” we show that the temporal delay between excitation and inhibition, shown in red and blue in the traffic light, can gate signal propagation in neuronal circuits. The article received international press coverage, including the Greek weekly newspaper To Vima (html, pdf). We also wrote a preview about this article in BioSpektrum (pdf). A figure of this paper was used in the review Kumar et al. 2010 Nature Review Neuroscience 11(9) 615- 627.

©Bernstein Center Freiburg

Kremkow et al. 2010a Journal of Computational Neuroscience

This paper was highlighted in the Bernstein Newsletter 07/2010, “Precise signal transmission in the brain”. A figure of this paper was used in the review Bruno 2010 Current Opinion in Neurobiology 21:1-8.